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EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS TRAININGS

Two police officers by their patrol car
Emergency supplies
A CCTV camera
A fire hose and extinguisher in a hallway
An abandoned bag in an airport

DPrep Safety is committed to offering well-researched training, education and consultation that stresses the importance of preparedness prior to responding to disasters, emergencies, and crisis events. DPrep Safety also has a deep bench of law enforcement and safety experts that make the team one that can address your unique safety concerns.

The DPrep Safety team offers a variety of courses that will help improve threat assessment, situational awareness, response to an active assailant, and bomb threat awareness and response. DPrep Safety can assess building security and safety, and present protective actions suggested through the crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) model. Whether it be walking through your space for a threat, vulnerability, and risk assessment (TVRA), or talking with school administrators or parents about fencing, bullet resistant windows or reunification plans, we are committed to offering uniquely tailored programs designed to keep your school, workplace, house of worship or college/university safe and secure and to reduce your exposure to liability.

 

DPrep Safety has a commitment to training law enforcement professionals, school resource officers (SROs), and crisis and emergency first responders to enhance their skills and enable them to be more productive and effective in their role to protect and serve. DPrep Safety has your six.  We also have the experience and instructional design capacity to offer training in virtual, in-person, and hybrid formats to meet the needs of your department or organization

For more information or to schedule any of these courses, please contact bethany@dprep.com. Click "More" below for details on each of the courses.

D-Prep Safety Tips

A Team Approach to Assessing, Managing, and Mitigating Threat

  • Master common terminology and concepts in threat assessment

  • Explore the multi-disciplinary approach to threat assessment and mitigation

  • Learn to develop threat mitigations plans through a community approach

  • Attended a training? View supplemental materials.

A Team Approach to Assessing, Managing, and Mitigating Threat

 

Law enforcement professionals, in collaboration with community partners such as school counselors and administrators, are tasked with the job of keeping our schools, colleges, and workplaces free of violence and acts of targeted aggression, commonly known as mass shootings. This course offers a practical approach in the recognition and prevention of violence in schools, colleges, workplaces, and communities. This course is designed to provide the terminology, assessment, and intervention skills needed to identify a threat and develop a community-based collaborative mitigation plan.

 

Designed for law enforcement professionals, but inclusive of all community partners, participants will learn how to develop a violence risk mitigation plan tied to a multi-disciplinary team assessment. They will review concepts related to targeted vs. affective violence, transient and substantive threats, risk and protective/anchor factors for targeted violence, and how BIT/CARE and threat teams operate in law enforcement agencies, schools, colleges workplaces and communities.

 

D-Prep Safety brings together a team of diverse experienced faculty to tackle this course from the perspectives of counseling, law enforcement, conduct, DEI, Title IX, and human resources. We provide an intersectional perspective that draws from the best research and practice in each of these fields. The multi-disciplinary approach to threat assessment is a best practice supported by the leading governmental organizations and subject matter experts in the field.

Module One: Overview of Threat/Risk Assessment Comments

  • Defining threat, risk, and psychological assessments

  • Defining affective vs. targeted/mission-oriented violence

  • Examples of transient and substantive threats

  • Threat assessment process/team related to BIT/CARE model

  • Triage systems (Pathways) and VRA (DarkFox)

Module Two: Understanding the Multi-Disciplinary Team Approach

  • Team function: gathering information, assessment, and interventions

  • Mission, scope, and membership

  • Bias mitigation through an objective risk rubric

  • Policy and procedures

  • Record keeping and documentation (FERPA, HIPAA and confidentiality laws)

  • Team process: meeting flow and the C.A.S.E. model

Module Three: Overview of Risk and Protective Factors

  • Balancing the assessment of risk and protective factors

  • Understanding the role of culture and neurodivergence in risk/protective factors

  • Exploration of risk factors (including incel & white supremacist violence)

  • Exploration of protective/anchor factors

Module Four: Triage & Violence Risk Assessments

  • Defining triage assessments for each case on the team

  • Three cases explored as examples of triage assessment

  • Walking through of scoring cases on Pathways and developing intervention plans

  • Mitigation of bias using an expert system/checklist

  • Defining VRA threshold and demonstration of DarkFox through a case

  • Threat report example using the process of data gathering, anchor factor identification, risk factor identification, rubric application, summary of violence risk, and interventions (DARTS-I)

Module Five: Developing a Community Based Mitigation Plan

  • Understanding case management and threat management planning

  • Partners: counseling, schools, social supports, community, and religious supports

  • Building a community referral network: needs assessment, resource accessibility, culturally competent services, follow up and continuous improvement

  • Documentation

We created this course with an awareness of the budgetary needs of law enforcement, schools, colleges, and workplaces. While there is a temptation to increase billing through expanding course concepts into multiple days, our goal is to deliver the information efficiently and with fidelity.

 

Cost for Virtual Program

The course is taught in five 90-minute virtual classes scheduled at a convenient time for the law enforcement agency, school, college/university, housing authority or workplace. The cost is $285 per person.*

Cost for In-Person

The course is taught in-person in an eight-hour format. The cost is $285 per person.*

* We may require a minimum number of participants.

  • For virtual trainings, recordings* of each of the online classes to allow for content review and introducing concepts to new members (based on group purchases)

  • 12-month access to the Pathways and Darkfox threat assessment systems

  • Participants will receive access to a website containing supplemental documents, materials, and handouts including:​

    • Law Enforcement Assessment checklist

    • Law Enforcement Intervention checklist

    • Beyond the Red Flags: Preventing Mass Violence

    • Beyond the Red Flags Summary Sheet

    • Managing Disruptive and Dangerous Behavior

    • Overview of Social Media Basics

    • Back to School Safety Preparedness

    • Creating a Logistics Binder

    • CARE/BIT & Threat Audit Tool

    • C.A.S.E. (Context, Assess, Stabilize, Evaluate) Processing

    • Bias Mitigation

    • Referral Checklist and Service Audit

    • Before the Interview: Get Context

    • Safety in the Title IX Environment

    • Establishing Rapport

    • Advanced Interview Skills

    • Uvalde Case History

    • Uvalde Pathways Scoring

    • Uvalde DarkFox Scoring

    • Uvalde Violence Risk Report

    • Tabletop Exercises

    • Case Study One: A Catalyst Event

    • Case Study Two: A Modest Complaint

    • Case Study Three: Amortentia!

 

*Recordings are available for one year after the live program. Extended access to the recordings is offered at rate of 20% of the original live program price.

Disaster and Emergency Preparedness for Staff and Families

  • Learn to accurately assess the threat to be able to take effective action

  • Create a disaster preparedness toolkit at home and at work

  • Prepare your family for an emergency that might happen while you are at work

Disaster and Emergency Preparedness for Staff and Families

 

Being ready before a flood, hurricane, wildfire, mass shooting, power outage, hazmat spill, or medical emergency is critical to responding effectively. Given that there are many types of disasters and hazards/emergencies, it is important to identify what vulnerabilities and risks are present prior to the crisis occurring. One of the concerns DPrep has identified is ensuring staff and families have adequate personal emergency plans at their homes to ensure they are focused on effectively working as part of the implementation of the overall school, college, or university plan, knowing that they’re loved ones are safe and prepared.

As you prepare for disasters, it is important to 1) know your risks, 2) make a plan and 3) take action. For example, where you live might put you at a higher risk for certain events, like tornados, earthquakes, hazmat spills, or hurricanes. Having a plan in place that considers local resources and where you will be evacuating and sheltering will help you avoid danger. Taking direct action comes when you have a clear and effective plan that is built upon the local resources, skills, and materials you need to keep yourself, your family, and the community safe.

Having basic protective actions put in place before an emergency or disaster at home will improve your family’s ability to stay safe during the emergency and recover after the event. All family members having situational awareness will aid in the development of an effective all-hazard plan and improve the effectiveness of the response. Join our experienced and knowledgeable instructors as they provide you with knowledge, materials, and ability to assist you, your staff, and families to prepare for various disasters. We will identify and discuss various hazards, vulnerabilities, and risks and provide guidance on how to keep your staff and families safe prior to a disaster or emergency.

Participants will be able to:

  • Understand the need for preparedness training.

  • Demonstrate the skills needed to assess the nature of the disaster or emergency quickly, allowing them to take effective action.

  • Create a disaster preparedness toolkit of supplies and emergency funds.

  • Decrease potential impacts of hazards.

  • Prepare, practice, and implement a disaster plan.

DPrep prioritizes the vertical emergency management approach that outlines the importance of each person in an organization having the knowledge and ability to respond to an emergency event. Those planning for these events include administrative and emergency preparedness staff and those in law enforcement. Teachers, faculty, parents, and students should also have a knowledge of the risks, planning and how to act.

This course is designed specifically for staff and their families to ensure they are prepared prior to an emergency event and ready to act. By having staff and their families prepared as part of an overall emergency plan, this ensures the community-wide, system plan will have a higher likelihood of being implemented effectively.

Effective Crisis Communication

  • Develop a proactive media strategy for crisis events

  • Learn best practices for press conferences

  • Explore common blunders and missteps when communicating with the media

Effective Crisis Communication

Knowing how to successfully navigate and manage high stakes communication at a news conference, during emotional conversations with community members, during hiring and firing meetings, when discussing performance improvement plans, and within the departmental chain of command are essential skills for those asked to speak for the department to third parties. It is essential to have a strategy to communicate effectively, avoid blunders, and manage ‘hot spots’ in a way that addresses the third-party concerns while maintaining the integrity and goals of the department.

This course lays the groundwork necessary for organizations to respond effectively in a crisis or significant event. While communications delivered in daily situations are important, it is critical to understand the difference between daily communication practices and a crisis communication strategy. When done well, those communicating can build and sustain trust and effectively exhibit transparency and authenticity in their communications.

Our expert trainers are experienced in roles as crisis communicators and have not only experienced crisis events that require coordinated responses at the local, state, and federal level, they also have experience with local, national, and international media organizations and the public. As evidenced in recent crisis events, organizations that have identified and deployed crisis communication strategies are noted for their ability to navigate these events successfully.

This course will help participants learn to better navigate communication around crisis events and initiate a response from multiple jurisdictions and agencies. Our instructors will demonstrate the importance of understanding who releases information, when the information should be released, and how the information flows through a system. Emphasis will be placed on how to avoid confusing, conflicting, or inaccurate information being shared.

By developing and deploying a sound crisis communication strategy prior to a crisis incident, organizations put themselves in an advanced position to effectively manage communications with internal and external stakeholders. This, in turn, aids in defining how they can navigate an actual crisis.

Participants will be able to:

  • Know what to say and not to say to the media.

  • Demonstrate effective techniques and tactics during a news conference.

  • Know how to communicate effectively during high stakes conversations such as:

    • Development and management of a performance improvement plan (PIP).

    • Hiring and firing decisions and implementations.

    • Talking with upset community members.

  • Build a strategy to communicate effectively and clearly.

  • Become aware of and avoid common blunders and missteps.

  • Navigate foreseeable hotspots in media communications.

In most institutions, the chief communications officer (CCO) or public information officer (PIO) is charged with the responsibility to provide leadership and direction for the organization’s media relations, public relations and marketing programs, and employee communications. They are also responsible for communicating the institution’s vision, mission, goals, and objectives. In a crisis event, the CCO or the PIO from an institution receives requests from internal and external stakeholders, including the media and other organizations, seeking information from the incident or event. This should be accomplished by the CCO and PIO understanding and following the incident command system (ICS) unified voice concept.

However, every person in an organization is subject to questions from the media, community members, and other third parties involved in a crisis. While funneling media statements and press conferences to a single person is a best practice, educating every person in the organization on these principles is an essential aspect of vertical emergency management. These would include:

  • Human resource professionals

  • Staff at the director, department head or chairperson levels of leadership

  • Those in leadership positions within the institution or organization

Mindset Active Assailant Prevention and Response

  • Attend to your surroundings to improve reaction time

  • Build the muscle memory to respond quickly in response to the level of threat and danger

  • Improve your critical decision making to improve your chances of survival

  • Attended a training? View supplemental materials.

Mindset logo

Mindset Active Assailant Prevention and Response

DPrep Safety’s Mindset active assailant prevention and response training blends the leading research in psychology, law enforcement, and military theory with our instructor’s practice and experience to emphasize early preparation prior to an attack. Through a trauma-informed approach to instructional design, we educate teachers, administrators, and other employees to increases awareness of their surroundings. This awareness improves reaction time and empowers community members to act rather than becoming frozen by fear or indecision. Mindset helps participants choose the best course of action, leading to a better chance of survival.

 

There are many approaches to violent assailants and active shooters. Some prioritize fighting and defending against active assailants, others focus on early readiness and live drills to form habits and ensure students and employees know what to do before the incident. Mindset teaches proactive situational awareness connected to practical application. We build the habits and muscle memory to respond quickly to the level of threat and danger. We do this in a trauma-informed practice, which means we consider the past experiences of those we train and design our material to remove obstacles to their understanding and retention of the material.

 

The training educates and empowers communities and educational institutions by providing best-in-class research and practical techniques to keep students, staff, faculty, and employees safe. Those attending the program walk away empowered and prepared, ready to act.

This training teaches the importance of situational awareness and preparation before an active assailant steps foot onto your campus grounds. Every individual at your school, college, or workplace has the responsibility to be aware of their surroundings and to activate a community wide response when warranted. The response will always be more effective when there is both system-wide and individual preparedness. The system-wide response involves clear communication (rather than code words), lockdown procedures that improve survivability, and target hardening that makes it more difficult for an attacker to carry out their mission. Community members are provided the knowledge needed to improve their critical decision making and improve their chances of survival.

 

Foundations

  • Situational awareness

  • Preparedness: system-wide and personal

  • Run, hide, defend/fight: taking wise action quickly

  • Practice and habit development

  • Law enforcement interaction during and after the incident

 

Situational Awareness

  • Understanding approach and attack behaviors

  • Early identification of suspicious and out of ordinary behaviors

  • Learning the survival arc to reduce time debating the best course of action

 

Preparation

  • System-wide

    • Common terminology, safer corners, locked doors

    • Visitor controls, limited entrance, CPTED (crime prevention through environmental design)

    • Covered windows, bullet resistant glass or film, school maps

    • Keys for police/fire, vertical emergency management

    • Crisis communication plan

    • Collaboration with all first responders

  • Personal

    • Situational awareness leading to a faster response

    • Developing the survival mindset

    • Body and stress, changes in gross and fine motor skills

    • O.O.D.A. loop

 

Critical Decision Making

  • Cover and concealment

  • Elevated position

  • Rate of fire

  • Safer corners and fatal funnel

  • Understanding the fatal funnel

  • Lockdown versus movement

  • Lessons from past attacks

    • Fire alarms

    • Locked doors

    • Bomb and fire threat

 

Active Response

  • What they need to know

  • Choosing run, hide, defend/fight

  • Identify items that may be used as weapons

  • Interacting with law enforcement

We created this course with an awareness of the budgetary needs of schools, colleges, workplaces, and houses of worship.

 

Virtual

The course is taught in a two-hour virtual format scheduled at a convenient time. We offer a Q&A follow up session with our instructors a week or two following the initial course. The cost of the course is $3500 and this includes a video recording of the course, detailed supplemental handouts, and materials available for a year past the live course date. Additional years of access may be purchased for 10% of the original purchase cost. 

 

In-Person

The course is taught in-person over a three-hour period and can be paired with additional courses or TVRA assessments to take advantage of bundle pricing. The cost of this course is $8500, inclusive of travel. Depending on location and the need for one or two instructors, there is some pricing flexibility.

 

To schedule a training, please contact bethany@dprep.com.

Any program that keeps people safe in an active assailant scenario must be built on the core theories from the worlds of criminology, psychology, law enforcement and military engagement. Theories covered in the program include:

  • Behavioral Threat Assessment. Dr. Brian Van Brunt's book, Harm to Others, summarizes the approach behaviors as they related to targeted, predatory and instrumental violence. Bringing together leading theorists in behavioral threat assessment, this book examines what to attend to prior to a targeted attack on a school, workplace, or house of worship.

  • The Bulletproof Mind. Lt. Dave Grossman reviews the practical application of the body under stress in his book The Bullet Proof Mind. Dr. Hart continues this discussion in his book Adrenaline and Stress to help readers understanding how the body reacts under stress and how to become aware of these limitations.

  • Active Shooter Events and Response. The research from the ALERT center is well summarized in Blair, Nichols, Burns and Curnutt’s book, Active Shooter Events and Response. Looking at law enforcement response to active shooting events provides important details and insights for those community members, students, faculty and employees who find themselves under attack.

  • The Gift of Fear. Gavin de Becker’s book, The Gift of Fear: Survival Signals That Protect Us from Violence, describes the importance of situational awareness and improving the speed and reaction time when violence is about to occur. Fear is seen as an essential tool in our survival of a critical incident. Fear, when directed away from worry, becomes the preparation that increases the safety of those at risk.

 

  • Vertical Emergency Management. This process teaches the importance of everyone in a school, college, or workplace setting having the knowledge, training, and skills to respond in an emergency scenario. Having a single person or inaccessible “red binder” silos critical response information and limits the ability to have a timely response. Discussed in emergency medical care, both National Incident Management System (NIMS), and Incident Command System (ICS) teach these concepts through Homeland Security.

  • Survival Arc. Amanda Ripley introduced the Survival Arc concept in her book, The Unthinkable: Who Survives When Disaster Strikes. The concept is broken down into three elements: denial, deliberation, and decisive action. By helping those under an active threat move past denial more quickly, we help them to reduce deliberation time when choosing a course of action and ultimately move them toward a decisive action more quickly.​

  • Left of Bang. Left of Bang was written by Patrick Van Horne and Jason Riley and teaches the importance of attending to the moments before something really bad happens. These concepts combine well with the survival arc and OODA loop to improve situational awareness and increase the drive to direct and decisive actions.​

  • O.O.D.A Loop. This approach to observation and response, Observe, Orient, Decide, Act, was first developed by Colonel John Boyd and has been applied to numerous systems problems in order to improve the speed and reaction during critical incidents. The recent book Beyond OODA: Developing the Orientation for Deception, Conflict and Violence was written by Varg Freeborn outlines the various applications of Boyd’s theory.

 

Missing Student/Person Protocol

  • Develop effective policies and procedures for addressing missing individuals

  • Learn how to collaborate with staff and local law enforcement

  • Discuss how best to communicate with parents, guardians, and the wider community

Missing Student/Person Protocol

Safety remains a top priority for academic institutions. There are occasions when academic institutions, campus safety and police departments receive reports of missing students or missing persons. This workshop will lead you through the immediate steps staff should take in various departments. These will be critical to initial determination if the individual has been the victim of a crime and/or is in danger, as well as efficiently and efficaciously aiding in the timely locating of the individual. By having a clear process that is consistently followed, we can better the chances of locating the missing individual more quickly while communicating with family, caregivers, and the community around the process. Our presenters will highlight the importance of a clear and consistent policy and protocol that outlines the steps staff and first responders are to take when they receive a request for assistance regarding a missing student/person. The program will include discussion on the importance of confidential contact information and provide practical guidance on the next steps staff, campus safety and police departments can take quickly in a collaborative manner. By working together, the school and local law enforcement will be in a better position to expand a search and allow the most current data to drive future action to locate the student or missing person. By quickly providing the necessary information, law enforcement agencies will be better able to deploy their search and recovery efforts (efforts similar to other emergency relief and disaster plans). Those who attend this program will more clearly understand what needs to be done, who is responsible to take these actions, and how the information is disseminated to the community and caregivers.

Mitigating Bias in Information Gathering, Decision Making and Interventions

  • Understand the nature and sources of bias

  • Understand common types of bias

  • Learn how to mitigate bias to improve accuracy and validity in our practices

Mitigating Bias in Information Gathering, Decision Making and Interventions

We all have bias. Bias impacts the way we see the world and make choices about how we interact with others. The goal of this workshop is to better understand and mitigate bias in our processes, not the removal of bias. This training provides an opportunity to explore how each of us sees the world and widens the aperture of awareness when working with others through assessment, crisis de-escalation and interventions. This workshop teaches the importance of improving the accuracy and validity of our processes as it applies to the three critical areas of gathering information, making decisions, and developing interventions.

Protecting the Flock: Safety and Security for Communities of Faith

  • Understand the physical and behavioral vulnerabilities within your faith community

  • Develop a safety and security plan to be prepared and reduce legal risk

  • Learn practice skills in behavioral assessment and crisis de-escalation for your team

Protecting the Flock: Safety and Security for Communities of Faith

Join Retired ATF Senior Special Agent Nina Delgadillo and behavioral threat expert Dr. Brian Van Brunt as they share with you a layered security approach to keeping congregants safe. Houses of worship present a target to those planning violence against certain ideologies and communities and we have a duty to prepare to respond to these dangers. Our seasoned presenters will share with you the importance of developing a safety and security plan that includes both an assessment of physical security measures (cameras, fences, bollards, doors, refuge points) and behavioral threat assessment concepts (risk factors for targeted violence, behavioral indicators for violence potential).

 

The training is useful for greeters, ushers, leadership team members, volunteers, members of your safety and security team, and any community members with past medical, law enforcement or psychological training. Drawing from core concepts in law enforcement, psychology and threat assessment, this training offers a wide range of content useful for new and seasoned teams alike. From crisis de-escalation skills to developing policy and procedures to responding in the event of an active threat, this program will offer clear, well-researched and practical advice proven to reduce the risk of violence and save lives.

 

This one-day course spends the two morning sessions introducing and reviewing key concepts related to emergency preparedness planning and the importance of adopting a prevention, intervention, post-vention approach. Core concepts in physical security as well as behavioral assessment of threat indicators will be discussed. In the afternoon sessions, our team will share three programs developed by the Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency offered in a “train-the-trainer” capacity, leaving the group with the ability to teach core concepts related to the Power of Hello, Crisis De-escalation, and Behavioral Threat Indicators. The course will end with a review of important response training related to an active shooter.

Module One: Introduction and Preventions, Intervention and Post-Vention

  • Presenter’s introduction and course outline

  • Case examples from past attacks and disruptive behaviors

  • Understanding a vertical emergency management approach

  • Developing a preparedness mindset (growth vs. fixed)

  • Prevention

    • The role of behavioral risk/threat assessment

    • Defining and developing an emergency operation plan (EOP) and COOP

    • ICS/NIMS and FEMA courses

    • Situational awareness and all-hazard preparedness

  • Intervention

    • Crisis de-escalation and hostage negotiation

    • Active shooter/violent intruder response

    • First aid, CPR & Stop the Bleed

  • Post-venation

    • Crisis media communications

    • Critical incident stress management

    • Core principals of an after-action report (AAR)

  

Module Two: Behavioral Threat and Physical Security

  • Core Concepts in Behavioral Threat Analysis

    • Affective and targeted violence

    • Transient and substantive threat

    • Behavioral threat indicators

  • Physical Security and Threat Violence Risk Assessments (TVRA)

    • Hardening the target

    • Physical TVRA core principles

    • TVRA checklist

    • Practical exercise: walk through of the facility

 

Module Three: Train-the-Trainer

  • Behavioral Threat Indicators

  • The Power of Hello

  • Crisis De-escalation

 

Module Four: Active Shooter/Violent Intruder (90 min)

  • Understand the pathway to violence and what you can do to disrupt it

  • Your response during an active threat

  • What you can expect to happen when law enforcement responds

  • Create a plan, practice the plan and execute the plan

  • Be Informed, Be Empowered, Be Prepared, Be Ready!

We created this course with an awareness of the budgetary needs of houses of worship. While there is a temptation to increase billing through expanding course concepts into multiple days, our goal is to deliver the information efficiently and with fidelity.

 

We offer two options for pricing for virtual or in-person trainings.

 

Flat Fee Pricing

Cost for Virtual Program

The course is taught in five 90-minute virtual classes scheduled at a convenient time faith community. The cost is course is $6500.

 

Cost for In-Person

The course is taught in-person in an eight-hour format. The cost of this course is $8500, inclusive of travel for two presenters.

 

Per Person Cost*

Cost for Virtual Program

The course is taught in five 90-minute virtual classes scheduled at a convenient time for the group. The cost is $285 per person.

 

Cost for In-Person

The course is taught in-person in an eight-hour format. The cost is $285 per person.

* The per person cost is available when the presenters are traveling near the community and/or with a potential minimum. This option also works well when there are additional community members that may like to attend to off-set the total cost.

We host a unique website for the training class that contains all the materials below.

  • For virtual trainings, recordings of each of the online classes to allow for content review and introducing concepts to new members (based on group purchases)

  • Supplemental documents, materials, and handouts including:

    • TVRA Checklist

    • Beyond the Red Flags article on preventing school shootings

    • Back to School Safety Planning

    • Tabletop exercises and case studies

    • Supplemental guide on addressing disruptive and dangerous behavior

  • Train-the-trainer

    • Supplemental materials and slide deck on the Power of Hello

    • Supplemental materials and slide deck for Crisis De-escalation

    • Supplemental materials and slide deck for Behavioral Threat Indicators

  • What is an FAQ section?
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  • Parent Safety Meeting
    DPrep provides an overview of the school safety measures to parents/guardians at the school site, as well as addresses parent/guardian’s safety concerns and provides an overview of the next steps in the critical response process. Parents/guardians will also be given crucial training on how to respond if there is a critical incident at the school. It is VERY important for parents/guardians to understand and know their role in the critical incident response process so that they do not hinder the emergency response at the school site.
  • School Security Officer/Campus Monitor Training Course (SB 1626)
    This is a 24-hour compliance course that meets the regulations under SB1626. Every campus security person or hall monitor working more than 20 hours per week needs to be certified as having attended this 24-hour, three-day school. This law applies to all K-12 schools and community colleges and includes both the district employees and contract security officers.
  • School Mandated Reporter Training
    All K-12 school personnel are mandatory reporters for: child abuse, weapons, assaults and drugs on campus. This is an Internet only training program that will qualify your school personnel for the mandatory reporter law. The course is taken on your timeframe at your facility over the Internet with full documentation and certificates issued in compliance with the regulations. No upcoming courses scheduled at this time.
  • Refresher-Campus Supervisor/School Security Officer Course (SB1626)
    Refresher/re-certification course for SB 1626 Campus Supervisor/School Security Officer Course No upcoming courses scheduled at this time
  • Conflict Resolution in Schools
    A modular 4-8 hour course that will enhance the ability of the educator to become an accomplished mediator. The training will discuss the barriers to successful mediation, recognition of the characteristic strategies of collaborative negotiation and the identification of the essential factors of constructive confrontation. No upcoming courses scheduled at this time.
  • Cyberbullying & Social Media
    DPREP and industry experts will educate Office of Education/School District staff on various aspects and issues that students and staff may experience and engage in, while using social media. May 30, 2018 | Placer County Office of Education– Rocklin,CA
  • Dealing with Difficult People and Surviving Violent Encounters
    This course is taught at your worksite and is ideal for public and private employees, school employees, university and junior college professionals that are in customer service or contact professional positions and have interaction with the public and fellow employees. No upcoming courses scheduled at this time.
  • Drug and Alcohol Identification in the School
    A course designed to be brought to your school to instruct classified and unclassified employees how to recognize the signs of alcohol and drug influence and to have the capability of testifying properly at a hearing. No upcoming courses scheduled at this time.
  • Nurtured Heart Approach (NHA) Introductory Workshops/Behavioral Intervention Training
    NHA is a relational methodology that promotes positive interactions and prevents escalation of negative behaviors while creating connection, promoting empathy and reducing exclusion. In a NHA environment, staff elevate their confidence in serving the behavior needs of all students, students create more empathetic relationships with adults and peers and require fewer discipline referrals, and schools become more equitable. NHA is built upon The 3 Stands™ to help students build Inner Wealth® and improve their social-emotional competency. Stand One: Absolutely No! You’ll learn how schools often accidentally promote negativity through traditional methods that are failing more and more of today’s students. Stand Two: Absolutely Yes! You’ll become aware of ways that you’re inspiring great behaviors and learn NHA techniques to get more of the behaviors you desire. Stand Three: Absolutely Clear! You’ll investigate ways that current rules might be inadvertently contributing to behavior problems and learn NHA strategies for clear rules and consistent consequences. NHA Introductory Workshops introduce the NHA fundamentals which can be taught in 4, 8, and/or 16-hour blocks. These introductory workshops are a unique combination of presentation, practice and processing. Come prepared to laugh while you learn! 4-Hour – An economical NHA kick-off that delivers NHA fundamentals. An excellent complement to an NHA book-study. 8-Hour – Extended content, practice and processing assist depth of understanding. Serves as a prerequisite for the NHA Certified Training Intensive. 16-Hour – The most comprehensive NHA introduction. Includes maximum NHA content, practice, processing, and planning. Serves as a prerequisite for the NHA Certified Training Intensive.
  • Critical Incident Response for Campus Police Officers
    This one-day course is designed to prepare the campus police officer to be an effective leader at a critical incident on a college or university campus. This course provides a comprehensive review of current field tactics, with an emphasis on the use of a four-step critical incident response plan that will be developed in class. No upcoming courses scheduled at this time.
  • Critical Incident Response on the College Campus (4 hours)
    This 4-hour course is designed as an introduction to prepare all school employees to handle an emergency event on their campus. There is no guarantee who will be available to handle the emergency on your campus; our approach is to train all the administrators, teachers, and classified employees how to work as a team during a crisis incident when time is your biggest enemy. we teach everyone a four-step critical incident response plan that is capable of handling all hazards on your campus. This is a 4-hour class designed to be taught at your school, on your time frame.
  • Critical Issues for Campus Safety K-12 (4–8 hours)
    A course is designed to prepare all school employees to handle an emergency event on their campus. There is no guarantee who will be available to handle the emergency on your campus; our approach is to train all the administrators, teachers and classified employees how to work as a team during a crisis incident when time is your biggest enemy. We teach everyone a four-step critical incident response plan that is capable of handling all hazards on your campus. This is a modified 4-hour module designed to be taught at your school, on your time frame.
  • Critical Issues for Campus Safety K-12 - REFRESHER (2 hours)
    This is a 2-hour refresher course that is designed to prepare all K-12 school employees to handle an emergency event on their campus, focusing on flood, fire, earthquake, hazmat, and large-scale criminal events. This is a 2-hour class designed to be taught at your school, on your time frame.
  • Emergency Management for Campus Executives
    A 1-day, eight-hour course designed to familiarize the college or university campus executive with the concept of utilizing the national standard incident command system to manage a large-scale emergency event. This class is designed to be brought to your campus and taught to your specific executive management group. No upcoming courses scheduled at this time.
  • Emergency Terminology for School Employees (1.5 hours)
    Audience: All classified and certificated school employees Lockdown, lockout, soft-lockdown, shelter-in-place, PIO, MCI, ICS – all commonly used terms in the school campus arena during a critical incident. It is crucial for school employees to be on the same page as first responders. Equally as important is that school districts and school sites must speak the same language in a critical incident and have a firm understanding of basic critical incident terminology. This workshop will provide you with the current and most up-to-date terminology for critical incidents as well standardizing emergency language throughout your school district. No upcoming courses scheduled at this time.
  • School Site Safety Plans
    Our team of experts will come to your school, survey your school site and then produce for you the state-mandated comprehensive school site safety plan. This service is contracted for individual schools as well as entire school districts.
  • Student Release & Reunification
    Student release and reunification after a crisis can be one of the scariest and yet most difficult tasks a school can be faced with. Release and reunification is the safe and controlled process for returning students back to their parents or guardians. Unlike fire and earthquake drills, release and reunification drills are more problematic to practice. This level 1 workshop was created to specifically train all school personnel and provide them with tools and knowledge in the process of effective student release and reunification. Participating staff will be given information on the latest methods and technology to assist them during a potential crisis that requires a student release and reunification.
  • Understanding the Complexities of Student Release/Reunification
    Audience: All classified, certificated, and volunteer school employees Student release and reunification after a crisis can be one of the scariest and yet most difficult tasks a school can be faced with. Release and reunification is the safe and controlled process for returning students back to their parents or guardians. Unlike fire and earthquake drills, release and reunification drills are more problematic to practice. This Level 1 workshop was created to specifically train all school personnel and provide them with tools and knowledge in the process of effective student release and reunification. Participating staff will be given information on the latest methods and technology to assist them during a potential crisis that requires a student release and reunification. (This class is a prerequisite to Student Release/Reunification Level 2.) No upcoming courses scheduled at this time.

SRO and Campus Safety Series

  • Addressing Criminal and Student Conduct Complaints

  • Diversity, Equity and Inclusion for Law Enforcement

  • Missing Student/Person Protocol 

  • Mitigating Bias in Information Gathering and Decision Making

Why this is program important:

School resource officers (SROs), campus safety officers, and law enforcement often find themselves in the position of responding to both complaints and concerns that have criminal implications and those limited to school or college conduct and discipline policy violations (non-criminal). SROs and campus police should have a clear understanding and accompanying procedure of how to respond to both criminal and non-criminal matters as they impact the school climate. Successful SRO and campus safety programs adopt a continuous education process for the school community, so they can reduce conflict and avoid surprises. This understanding and education within the school then becomes essential in the development of formal and informal memorandums of understanding (MOUs) and agreements with outside agencies and departments.

 

Law enforcement professionals working outside of the school environment need to develop a detailed understanding of conflicts and miscommunications that occur when interacting with K-12 schools, colleges, and universities. The program provides law enforcement professionals the opportunity to improve their understanding and communication with schools and colleges within their area of responsibilities.

 

Program overview:

This course reviews the importance of the school resource officers and campus safety officers developing a firm understanding and grounding in terms of criminal and non-criminal matters as they occur within the school or college climate. Additionally, law enforcement agencies working with schools, colleges, and universities will be able to improve their communication with SROs and campus law enforcement. The course provides clear examples of how to differentiate criminal and non-criminal incidents and the importance of educating and communicating within the school community. Supplemental materials include checklists, common examples of incident responses, and information on educating the community and BIT/CARE on the difference between criminal and non-criminal actions.

 

Participants will be able to:

  • Understand common examples of criminal incidents that occur within a school including threats, sexual assault, physical violence, and weapons possession.

  • Understand common examples of non-criminal incidents including behavioral escalations, minor conduct violations, and non-compliance in the classroom.

  • Understand about several missteps that occur when SROs and campus safety officers respond to various types of concerns and complaints.

  • Discuss ways to work collaboratively within the school to ensure a multidisciplinary, culturally informed, and team-based approach.

We all have bias. Bias impacts the way we see the world and make choices about how we interact with others. The goal of this workshop is to better understand and mitigate bias in our processes, not the removal of bias. This training provides an opportunity to explore how each of us sees the world and widens the aperture of awareness when working with others through assessment, crisis de-escalation and interventions. This workshop teaches the importance of improving the accuracy and validity of our processes as it applies to the three critical areas of gathering information, making decisions, and developing interventions.​

Safety remains a top priority for academic institutions. There are occasions when academic institutions, campus safety and police departments receive reports of missing students or missing persons. This workshop will lead you through the immediate steps staff should take in various departments. These will be critical to initial determination if the individual has been the victim of a crime and/or is in danger, as well as efficiently and efficaciously aiding in the timely locating of the individual. By having a clear process that is consistently followed, we can better the chances of locating the missing individual more quickly while communicating with family, caregivers, and the community around the process. Our presenters will highlight the importance of a clear and consistent policy and protocol that outlines the steps staff and first responders are to take when they receive a request for assistance regarding a missing student/person. The program will include discussion on the importance of confidential contact information and provide practical guidance on the next steps staff, campus safety and police departments can take quickly in a collaborative manner. By working together, the school and local law enforcement will be in a better position to expand a search and allow the most current data to drive future action to locate the student or missing person. By quickly providing the necessary information, law enforcement agencies will be better able to deploy their search and recovery efforts (efforts similar to other emergency relief and disaster plans). Those who attend this program will more clearly understand what needs to be done, who is responsible to take these actions, and how the information is disseminated to the community and caregivers.

We all have bias. Bias impacts the way we see the world and make choices about how we interact with others. The goal of this workshop is to better understand and mitigate bias in our processes, not the removal of bias. This training provides an opportunity to explore how each of us sees the world and widens the aperture of awareness when working with others through assessment, crisis de-escalation and interventions. This workshop teaches the importance of improving the accuracy and validity of our processes as it applies to the three critical areas of gathering information, making decisions, and developing interventions.

Our Team

Brian Van Brunt, EdD

Brian Van Brunt, EdD

Director of Behavior & Threat Management

brian@dprep.com

Brian Van Brunt, EdD, is the Director of Behavior and Threat Management for D-Prep Safety. Author of over a dozen books, Brian has spent time as a child and family therapist, university professor, assistant deputy director of training at Secure Community Network, partner at TNG, and president of the National Association for Behavioral Intervention and Threat Assessment (NABITA). He is an internationally recognized expert in behavioral intervention, threat assessment, mental illness, crisis preparedness and response, and instructional design. Brian has provided consulting services to schools, colleges, and universities across the country and abroad on a wide variety of topics related to student mental health, counseling, campus violence, and behavioral intervention.
David Denino, LPC, NCC

David Denino, LPC, NCC

Southern CT State University

david@daviddenino.com

David Denino, LPC, NCC, worked in higher education and college counseling over the past several decades and is director emeritus of counseling services at Southern Connecticut State University. David is a master trainer of Question Persuade Refer (QPR) and was the key person in bringing the QPR model to the state university system in Connecticut. A certified clinical trauma professional, David is also a Red Cross mental health first responder and is the mental health lead for the states of Connecticut and Rhode Island. As such, he has assisted with relief efforts for hurricanes Katrina, Sandy, and Harvey as well as provided mental health support at the Sandy Hook and Las Vegas shootings.
Tammy Hodo, PhD
Tammy L. Hodo, PhD, has been working in the diversity, equity, and inclusion field for most of her professional career. Being biracial and reared in the Midwest, Tammy learned early on that race, although a social construct, impacts life chances and experiences. She has the lived experience of being both European American and African American. Coming from a middle-class family and being reared in a predominantly white space provided her opportunities she would later learn were not available to everyone that presented/looked like her. She has written peer-review articles about the experiences of minorities in academia.
Lisa Pescara-Kovach, PhD

Lisa Pescara-Kovach, PhD

University of Toledo

lisa.kovach@utoledo.edu

Lisa Pescara-Kovach, PhD, is a professor of educational psychology at The University of Toledo where she also serves as the Director of the Center for Education in Mass Violence and Suicide and Chair of the Mass Violence Collaborative. Lisa’s international and national level peer-reviewed and invited presentations include, but are not limited to, the topics of suicides and homicides related to bullying victimization, behavioral threat assessment, and school, campus, and workplace shootings. Lisa co-authored White Supremacist Violence: Understanding the Resurgence and Stopping the Spread. Her most recent publications address media contagion in connection to suicides and targeted shootings as well as the mental health and mass shooting myth.
Chris Taylor, PhD

Chris Taylor, PhD

Executive Director, InterACTT

chris@interactt.org

Chris Taylor, PhD, a 30-year veteran of higher education, serves as the executive director of the International Association for Care and Threat Teams (InterACTT). He recently left his position as the dean of students and chief student affairs officer at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio where he had responsibility for counseling and wellness, student advocacy, student union and programs, recreational sports, residence life, and student conduct. He also chaired the university CARE and threat team. He has served on the leadership team for the Association of Student Conduct Administrators, and has been a member of NASPA, ACPA, ACUHO-I, and the American Men's Studies Association. He is a trained Title IX adjudicator and has also worked with D Stafford and Associates as a national Clery Act consultant.
Chris Usher

Chris Usher

ARDENT Protection

ushercl3094@gmail.com

Chris Usher serves as the Director of Security Operations for ARDENT Protection and has over twenty years of experience in law enforcement, government, non-profit, and security management in private security sectors. He has worked with the United State Marine Corp, U.S. Department of State, Department of Labor, as well as Fortune 500 companies. His experience includes creating, implementing, and directing holistic security programs focused on safety, protection, physical security, counterintelligence, crisis management, disaster recovery, and training.
Baron Brown, EdD, MPA, MBA

Baron K. Brown, EdD, MPA, MBA

CPS HR Consulting

Dr. Baron Brown is a deeply experienced professional in the areas of leadership, law enforcement, public policy, national security and equity-related workplace issues. As a former diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) officer for a southern CA city, he brings both his civil rights and investigative experience from the challenging fields of law enforcement, military operations and higher education at the community college and university levels. Baron has supervised and managed in a large law enforcement agency, and served as an advocate and investigator in discrimination cases. This municipal experience in the areas of diversity, equity and policy were complemented by 12+ years of experience in the U.S. military as a civil rights officer and 3 years as a personnel officer. He is a well-established orator and has served as a public speaker for several non-profit organizations. Baron is impassioned about equity, humanity, and opportunity in higher education, having retired from a Hispanic serving institution (HSI) and visited 31 Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in his doctoral work covering equity and opportunity and the sense of belonging for historically underserved minority students matriculating through higher education institutions.
Joseph Dooley

Joseph Dooley

Southern Connecticut State

jmdool@att.net

Joseph Dooley has been Chief of Police/Director of Public Safety at Southern Connecticut State University in New Haven, Conn, since 2006. In this position, he leads 28 sworn officers, seven full-time civilian personnel and 24 part-time University Assistants, all of whom are responsible for the safety and security of the university’s 12,000 students, faculty and staff. Prior to joining Southern, Chief Dooley served for 25 years with the Orange, Conn., Police Department. In 2002, he was elevated to Chief of Police, where he oversaw a department of 42 sworn and 12 civilian personnel for the next four years.
Amy Murphy, PhD

Amy Murphy, PhD

Angelo State University

amy.murphy@angelo.edu

Amy Murphy, PhD, serves as an associate professor of student development and higher education leadership at Angelo State University. She is also the program coordinator for the M.Ed. in student development and leadership in higher education as well as the graduate certificate in academic advising, both fully online programs. Amy has more than 20 years of experience in higher education and student affairs. She is formerly the dean of students and managing director of the Center for Campus Life at Texas Tech University. Her experiences include chair of the school’s behavioral intervention team, oversight of prevention and response activities for gender-based violence and discrimination as the deputy Title IX coordinator for students, as well as administrative involvement in student conduct, disability services, counseling, and enrollment management.
Robert Scholz, MA, LMFT, LPCC

Robert Scholz, MA, LMFT, LPCC

The Change Place

robert@roberttherapy.com

Robert Scholz, MA, LMFT, LPCC, is a licensed psychotherapist in California and Arizona, as well as a consultant and trainer throughout the United States. He has served in many clinical and leadership roles over the past 25 years, working in university, community mental health, forensic and private practice settings. Robert is well-known for his work as a trainer and consultant in assisting schools/universities and communities respond to major crisis events like wildfires, mass shootings, deaths of students/employees and responding to sexual and other types of interpersonal violence. He serves as the clinical supervisor for the Route 91 So Cal Heals project, which provides case management, peer support and support group care for survivors and family members impacted by the Las Vegas and Borderline Nightclub mass shootings.
Charlie Taylor

Charlie Taylor

Affiliated Consultant

charlie@dprepsafety.com

Charlie Taylor is certified in Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) and is a suicide prevention gatekeeper instructor through the Question, Persuade and Refer (QPR) program. Charlie has a long career history in personal management, interviewing, conflict resolution, hiring practices, performance improvement planning and employee termination. He has certification in Basic Incident Command System for Initial Response (100, 200), National Incident Management System (700, 800) and is a firearm instructor and competitive shooter with the National Rifle Association. Working in tandem with our DPrep Safety team members with expertise in psychology, law enforcement and threat assessment, Charlie supports DPrep Safety with interviews, physical security data gathering, and assessments as well training in situational awareness and all-hazard response during natural and manmade disasters.
Jacques Whitfield, JD
Jacques Whitfield, JD, is a seasoned human resources executive with over 25 years of experience in human resources management. Jacques recently completed a six year tenure as the chief human resources officer for the Yuba Community College District. Jacques was responsible for the management and oversight of the human resources operations for the district and is credited with revitalizing and streamlining the human resource operations for the Yuba Community College District. Jacques is a subject matter expert in performance management, employee engagement and state and federal EEO compliance matters. He is highly accomplished in successfully working with others to develop professional skills and improve employee effectiveness through training and development. Jacques is a frequent speaker, trainer and presenter.

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